Denmark: Where Sheep Have More Rights Than People, but You Can Still Euthanize a Perfectly Fine Giraffe 11

There’s something certainly not right in Denmark…

Denmark: Sheep-Friendly; Caveat Young Humans And Giraffes

Denmark: Sheep-Friendly; Caveat, Young Humans and Giraffes

I’m all in favor of the ethical treatment of animals, but please, bear with me, because I seem to have missed the point here, somewhere. 

So, you say, “Animal rights come before religion.” That’s why your government has now banned slaughtering animals for the production of halal and kosher meat. It makes sense that religious leaders are enraged over this. It also makes sense that you could care less about these people or their religion. You’ve placed the rights of animals over people, just to placate a handful of vocal activists in your country.

I understand that. It’s been a growing trend for quite some time now, that governments don’t respect basic human rights anymore. We have that problem in my country too.

But then there’s this thing with the giraffe, which I though was kind of silly and did not think much of it, at first, but now it’s got me thinking. How is it that you can euthanize a perfectly healthy animal, just because you can’t find it a suitable mate?

If I understood correctly, the big concern was that the giraffe would succumb to inbreeding and so it was decided that it would be best to kill it, instead of sterilizing it or sending it somewhere else. And that way, you could cut it open in front of little children — best of all worlds, eh?

You can sacrifice a giraffe in the name of good science, but you can’t slaughter a sheep for religious purposes.

What am I still missing here?

Here’s what you’re missing: this is the culture of death, stupid. It’s all about euthanasia, that a life that entails any suffering isn’t worth living anymore. That’s why we had to kill this giraffe; that’s why we can kill children; and that’s why killing a sheep or a goat, without stunning or sedating it first, is strictly prohibited. None of this has anything to do with so-called “religious freedom,” because…

Because when it comes to pleasure and pain — the only standard for determining the value of life — we’re all equal. That is the basis for animal rights, and those are the only rights we can speak of (according to the animal rights and assisted suicide advocates). Giraffes, sheep, goats, little children — everybody — we’re all the same.

I see. So, basically what you are telling me is that I’m pretty much just as good as a sheep. Have the sheep been allowed cast their vote yet? Let’s hear what they have to say:

“Baaaaaaa!”

And what’s your take on animal slaughter?

11 comments

  1. Here in Canada, we’re waiting for the final vote to determine whether euthanasia/physician assisted suicide becomes legal in the province of Quebec. I read today that the Quebec National Assembly is going to fast-track the vote before their upcoming provincial election.

    • We inherited original sin from Adam, but alas! we can’t blame him for our actual sins, so… only in part. We need to own up to it, if we want to start being reasonable.

  2. Priorities…

    From Catholic Memes: “Belgium legalizes child euthanasia, and no one bats an eye. Denmark euthanizes a giraffe, and everybody loses their minds.”
    (Wish I could share the photo, but I’m having technical difficulties.)

  3. What a strange world we live in.
    I grieve for the poor giraffe, to tell the truth, but I am flabbergasted at those who would kill an unborn child in the third trimester yet cry for a slaughtered animal. Don’t people think ANYTHING through?
    You make such excellent points in this post.

    • Do people think anything through? — that is the question! I’d say, Yes they do. They think through their own opinions thoroughly, but without giving much consideration to everything else that’s relevant, like the fact that the real world they actually live in doesn’t square with their thinking.

      • I agree! I believe that people think things through, but unfortunately, they are using a flawed thought process–one more in line with what’s socially acceptable, rather than one that follows God’s teachings and a good code of morality. I find it rather disheartening…

      • I agree, it’s very disheartening, but I remain optimistic. I always started off my epistemology course (that’s philosophy of knowledge) with this principle, and kept coming back to it: “The human mind has the natural capacity to know the truth with absolute certainty.”

        The reasons why we don’t always grasp the truth are too numerous to list here, but none of them detract from the fact that we are able to get it right, and correct our errors when we are wrong. If that were not the case, we’d really be in trouble, and there would be no point to even trying. But there is a point to trying. All people can come to know the truth, and the truth will set them free!

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